“Finally, a country album for our true heroes, truckers.”

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yago music reviews by roots music underground.

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Summary of a news story

After 25 years, George Arlis Highfill finally releases an album dedicated to truck drivers.

dateline

For immediate release.

“Thank a Trucker” Album release by George Arlis Highfill, Aug. 22, 2023.

body

Goerge Arlis Highfill’s new country album, “Thank a Trucker”, will be released worldwide on Aug 22, 2023.

After 25 years, george highfill finally releases an album dedicated to truck drivers.

Steven David Austin is a musician and music critic.  His writing style is a joy.
The review he did about George Highfill’s upcoming album is spectacular.

“George Highfill may not have the same name recognition as, say, George Strait, but he’s definitely punching in the same weight class when it comes to delivering a country song. His latest album, “Thank A Trucker,” is a testament to his immense talent and unwavering dedication to the craft. This collection of original songs is a delightful throwback to the purest form of country and western music, capturing the essence of the genre with authenticity and passion. Indeed, if the 11 songs on “Thank a Trucker” don’t give you a Pavlovian craving for a cold beer and a dance floor, you might want to check your pulse because you just might be dead. While Highfill may have been out of the American public eye for a while, it seems that he has found an enthusiastic audience across the Atlantic in Europe. The seeds of “Thank A Trucker” were sown in Finland where Highfill and longtime collaborator Borje Nylund began writing and producing these songs, and harvested in California, where another longtime collaborator, Paul Marshall, assembled some of the West Coast’s finest country musicians, bringing their impeccable skills and heartfelt connection to traditional country music. The musicianship on “Thank A Trucker” is top-notch, with Highfill surrounded by talented individuals who play with both skill and heart. The album showcases a range of subgenres within the country idiom, while maintaining a pure, traditional sound. The title track, “Thank a Trucker,” following in the footsteps of Dave Dudley and Red Simpson, pays homage to the hardworking individuals who tirelessly deliver goods across the country. Highfill’s storytelling shines through, weaving a tale of sacrifice, perseverance, and the resilience of those who make their living on the open highway. It sets the tone for the entire collection, capturing the spirit of the album. Highfill’s ability to deliver a sad song is where he truly shines, and “Too Sad to Sing” is a prime example of his mastery in that realm. Co-written by Paul Marshall and Butch Hendrix, this tear-jerker is evocative of the emotional depth found in the works of country legend George Jones. Highfill’s delivery resonates with the listener, tugging at their heartstrings and immersing them in a world of sorrow and vulnerability. Similarly, “Two Merles and a Buck” is another poignant track that ends with Highfill urging the listener to “play some real country.” It’s a heartfelt plea that captures the essence of traditional country music and serves as a reminder of its enduring power. . George Highfill’s “Thank A Trucker” is a testament to his unwavering commitment to traditional country and western music. With its heartfelt ballads, toe-tapping honky-tonk tunes, and everything in between, this album showcases Highfill’s immense talent and his ability to transport listeners to a bygone era. Whether he’s delivering a tear-jerker or a lively dance number, Highfill’s authenticity shines through, capturing the essence of the genre and reminding us why traditional country music holds a special place in our hearts. “Thank a Trucker” is a must-listen for anyone who appreciates the beauty and power of real country music.”

We’ll keep you up to date, check yago.com for updates.

END

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quotes

George Highfill is a new country artist in the traditional line, and here’s one of the guys “who’s gonna fill some shoes?” Cashbox Magazine

“Brilliant in Gunzburg: George Highfill…The Hank Williams of the 90’s” Country Express, Germany

You are delivering magnificent music and entertainment for every fancier of country music. You have a wonderful and hearty relationship with your audience. You love what you are doing and that is unmistakable” Susanne Liebau, Country-Music Press, Germany

contact

Stream the album on all major services.

Find a CD in all truck stops across America.

You took the bronc right out of me now I’m now I’m changing can’t you see you’ve got me in a curtain hanging mood.
What could be a better way of saying you are truly in love.
I went to school with George.  I remember he played guard for the Stigler Panthers football team that went to state.  They lost the championship game but second is great.
Even then for some reason I had George doing a Bob Dylan song.  Can’t remember the situation but I’m sure George’s friend Barbara was involved .  So you could say that was when I started following George” music.
Well years passed and George to Nashville where he and my money quickly learned a music business lesson.  Things weren’t happening in Nashville so George moved to LA.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.


Left Oklahoma back in 1935 to get out of the dust bowl and find a way to earn money.
There was nothing left to do besides beg, borrow, and steel.
So they packed their bags and headed for Bakersfield.

They traveled across the desert and that was tough enough but I can’t imagine how they felt when they hit the sands of the San Joaquin, but the last chance of hope was Bakersfield.

When they got to Bakersfield they went to work in the lush Bakersfield Valley.  It was hard work but they still had time for their music.
There was a hard edge to the lead guitar and a hard edge to the steel and there’s hard times and blood lines in the music born in Bakersfield.  Buck Owens and Merle Haggard were instrumental to the Bakersfield sound.  They sang about honkytonks, prisons, and trains.”
If you could get water or rain then the desert would explode into a wonderful world of desert blooms.

There plenty of jobs and Bakersfield became the “Okies” land of milk and honey and the hard edge of people like Don Rick of the Buckaroos on guitar and Tom Brumley on steel guitar brought it all together.

The Bakersfield sound was expanding with players like Roy Nichols
and Norm Hamlin (steel guitarist for Merle Haggard).
Somehow the steel guitar always brought the music together.
There’s hard times and blood lines in the music born in Bakersfield.

George’s story of the “Okie” migration to California with, “The Music born in Bakersfield” is a Woody Guthrie heart felt great song.  It’s worth the time.

Roy Nichols (October 21, 1932 – July 3, 2001) was an American country music guitarist best known as the lead guitarist for country music legend Merle Haggard‘s band The Strangers for more than two decades. He was known for his guitar technique, a mix of fingerpicking and pedal steel-like bends, usually played on a Fender Telecaster electric guitar. Nichols is considered one of the founders of the country music subgenre the “Bakersfield Sound”, which includes such notable country artists as Haggard, Buck Owens, and Don Rich[1]

For most country music fans, the term “The Bakersfield Sound” conjures memories of two California-born acts: Merle Haggard and Buck Owens and The Buckaroos. The latter would’ve sounded way different to the masses were it not for the musical contributions of longtime Buckaroos guitarist and fiddler Don Rich.

Born Donald Eugene Ulrich on Aug. 15, 1941, the Olympia, Wash. native proved to be a child prodigy. By age 16, he opened for Elvis Presley at the Tacoma Lincoln Bowl. Owens happened to work at a Tacoma radio station at the time, placing him in the perfect position to land a top-notch fiddle player for his backing band.

By 1960, Rich and his young family relocated to Bakersfield so he could become a full-time Buckaroo. Soon, Owens’ not-so-secret weapon worked with a changing cast of influential country musicians, including bassist Doyle Holly, pedal steel guitar player Tom Brumley, drummer Willie Cantu and others.

Life with Owens and his Buckaroos allowed Rich to see the world, from New York’s Carnegie Hall to Kosei Nenkin Hall in Tokyo, Japan. More importantly, he played his Fender telecaster on Owens’ best treble-heavy sides for Capitol Records, including “Together Again,” “Love’s Gonna Live Here” and “Act Naturally.” He also regularly appeared with Owens on TV shows, most notably the Buck Owens Ranch Show and, more famously, Hee Haw. On the latter, Rich stood out in the more serious segments, for both his striking appearance in Western wear and his clear status as one of the greatest American side musicians at a time when the Wrecking Crew made Los Angeles a recording hotbed.

You took the bronc right out of me now I’m now I’m changing can’t you see you’ve got me in a curtain hanging mood.
What could be a better way of saying you are truly in love.
I went to school with George.  I remember he played guard for the Stigler Panthers football team that went to state.  They lost the championship game but second is great.
Even then for some reason I had George doing a Bob Dylan song.  Can’t remember the situation but I’m sure George’s friend Barbara was involved .  So you could say that was when I started following George” music.
Well years passed and George to Nashville where he and my money quickly learned a music business lesson.  Things weren’t happening in Nashville so George moved to LA.


Left Oklahoma back in 1935 to get out of the dust bowl and find a way to earn money.
There was nothing left to do besides beg, borrow, and steel.
So they packed their bags and headed for Bakersfield.

They traveled across the desert and that was tough enough but I can’t imagine how they felt when they hit the sands of the San Joaquin, but the last chance of hope was Bakersfield.

When they got to Bakersfield they went to work in the lush Bakersfield Valley.  It was hard work but they still had time for their music.
There was a hard edge to the lead guitar and a hard edge to the steel and there’s hard times and blood lines in the music born in Bakersfield.  Buck Owens and Merle Haggard were instrumental to the Bakersfield sound.  They sang about honkytonks, prisons, and trains.”
If you could get water or rain then the desert would explode into a wonderful world of desert blooms.

There plenty of jobs and Bakersfield became the “Okies” land of milk and honey and the hard edge of people like Don Rick of the Buckaroos on guitar and Tom Brumley on steel guitar brought it all together.

The Bakersfield sound was expanding with players like Roy Nichols
and Norm Hamlin (steel guitarist for Merle Haggard).
Somehow the steel guitar always brought the music together.
There’s hard times and blood lines in the music born in Bakersfield.

George’s story of the “Okie” migration to California with, “The Music born in Bakersfield” is a Woody Guthrie heart felt great song.  It’s worth the time.

Roy Nichols (October 21, 1932 – July 3, 2001) was an American country music guitarist best known as the lead guitarist for country music legend Merle Haggard‘s band The Strangers for more than two decades. He was known for his guitar technique, a mix of fingerpicking and pedal steel-like bends, usually played on a Fender Telecaster electric guitar. Nichols is considered one of the founders of the country music subgenre the “Bakersfield Sound”, which includes such notable country artists as Haggard, Buck Owens, and Don Rich[1]

For most country music fans, the term “The Bakersfield Sound” conjures memories of two California-born acts: Merle Haggard and Buck Owens and The Buckaroos. The latter would’ve sounded way different to the masses were it not for the musical contributions of longtime Buckaroos guitarist and fiddler Don Rich.

Born Donald Eugene Ulrich on Aug. 15, 1941, the Olympia, Wash. native proved to be a child prodigy. By age 16, he opened for Elvis Presley at the Tacoma Lincoln Bowl. Owens happened to work at a Tacoma radio station at the time, placing him in the perfect position to land a top-notch fiddle player for his backing band.

By 1960, Rich and his young family relocated to Bakersfield so he could become a full-time Buckaroo. Soon, Owens’ not-so-secret weapon worked with a changing cast of influential country musicians, including bassist Doyle Holly, pedal steel guitar player Tom Brumley, drummer Willie Cantu and others.

Life with Owens and his Buckaroos allowed Rich to see the world, from New York’s Carnegie Hall to Kosei Nenkin Hall in Tokyo, Japan. More importantly, he played his Fender telecaster on Owens’ best treble-heavy sides for Capitol Records, including “Together Again,” “Love’s Gonna Live Here” and “Act Naturally.” He also regularly appeared with Owens on TV shows, most notably the Buck Owens Ranch Show and, more famously, Hee Haw. On the latter, Rich stood out in the more serious segments, for both his striking appearance in Western wear and his clear status as one of the greatest American side musicians at a time when the Wrecking Crew made Los Angeles a recording hotbed.

You took the bronc right out of me now I’m now I’m changing can’t you see you’ve got me in a curtain hanging mood.
What could be a better way of saying you are truly in love.
I went to school with George.  I remember he played guard for the Stigler Panthers football team that went to state.  They lost the championship game but second is great.
Even then for some reason I had George doing a Bob Dylan song.  Can’t remember the situation but I’m sure George’s friend Barbara was involved .  So you could say that was when I started following George” music.
Well years passed and George to Nashville where he and my money quickly learned a music business lesson.  Things weren’t happening in Nashville so George moved to LA.


Left Oklahoma back in 1935 to get out of the dust bowl and find a way to earn money.
There was nothing left to do besides beg, borrow, and steel.
So they packed their bags and headed for Bakersfield.

They traveled across the desert and that was tough enough but I can’t imagine how they felt when they hit the sands of the San Joaquin, but the last chance of hope was Bakersfield.

When they got to Bakersfield they went to work in the lush Bakersfield Valley.  It was hard work but they still had time for their music.
There was a hard edge to the lead guitar and a hard edge to the steel and there’s hard times and blood lines in the music born in Bakersfield.  Buck Owens and Merle Haggard were instrumental to the Bakersfield sound.  They sang about honkytonks, prisons, and trains.”
If you could get water or rain then the desert would explode into a wonderful world of desert blooms.

There plenty of jobs and Bakersfield became the “Okies” land of milk and honey and the hard edge of people like Don Rick of the Buckaroos on guitar and Tom Brumley on steel guitar brought it all together.

The Bakersfield sound was expanding with players like Roy Nichols
and Norm Hamlin (steel guitarist for Merle Haggard).
Somehow the steel guitar always brought the music together.
There’s hard times and blood lines in the music born in Bakersfield.

George’s story of the “Okie” migration to California with, “The Music born in Bakersfield” is a Woody Guthrie heart felt great song.  It’s worth the time.

Roy Nichols (October 21, 1932 – July 3, 2001) was an American country music guitarist best known as the lead guitarist for country music legend Merle Haggard‘s band The Strangers for more than two decades. He was known for his guitar technique, a mix of fingerpicking and pedal steel-like bends, usually played on a Fender Telecaster electric guitar. Nichols is considered one of the founders of the country music subgenre the “Bakersfield Sound”, which includes such notable country artists as Haggard, Buck Owens, and Don Rich[1]

For most country music fans, the term “The Bakersfield Sound” conjures memories of two California-born acts: Merle Haggard and Buck Owens and The Buckaroos. The latter would’ve sounded way different to the masses were it not for the musical contributions of longtime Buckaroos guitarist and fiddler Don Rich.

Born Donald Eugene Ulrich on Aug. 15, 1941, the Olympia, Wash. native proved to be a child prodigy. By age 16, he opened for Elvis Presley at the Tacoma Lincoln Bowl. Owens happened to work at a Tacoma radio station at the time, placing him in the perfect position to land a top-notch fiddle player for his backing band.

By 1960, Rich and his young family relocated to Bakersfield so he could become a full-time Buckaroo. Soon, Owens’ not-so-secret weapon worked with a changing cast of influential country musicians, including bassist Doyle Holly, pedal steel guitar player Tom Brumley, drummer Willie Cantu and others.

Life with Owens and his Buckaroos allowed Rich to see the world, from New York’s Carnegie Hall to Kosei Nenkin Hall in Tokyo, Japan. More importantly, he played his Fender telecaster on Owens’ best treble-heavy sides for Capitol Records, including “Together Again,” “Love’s Gonna Live Here” and “Act Naturally.” He also regularly appeared with Owens on TV shows, most notably the Buck Owens Ranch Show and, more famously, Hee Haw. On the latter, Rich stood out in the more serious segments, for both his striking appearance in Western wear and his clear status as one of the greatest American side musicians at a time when the Wrecking Crew made Los Angeles a recording hotbed.

YAGO the universal acronym.
Yago is one of the easiest names to remember. As in where do ya go? How do ya go? There ya go. yago is basically slang for you go, but everyone says yago.
Yago.com is a short 4 letter url with powerful functional use.
We are introducing the clothing line yago. For our pupoises it may stand for Your apparel guide online.
We developing this section of the page clothing and apparel to sell. With that being a launching point for the next great universal platform. Yago is as good as google, bing, or yahoo.

YAGO the universal acronym.
Yago is one of the easiest names to remember. As in where do ya go? How do ya go? There ya go. yago is basically slang for you go, but everyone says yago.
Yago.com is a short 4 letter url with powerful functional use.
We are introducing the clothing line yago. For our pupoises it may stand for Your apparel guide online.
We developing this section of the page clothing and apparel to sell. With that being a launching point for the next great universal platform. Yago is as good as google, bing, or yahoo.

YAGO the universal acronym.
Yago is one of the easiest names to remember. As in where do ya go? How do ya go? There ya go. yago is basically slang for you go, but everyone says yago.
Yago.com is a short 4 letter url with powerful functional use.
We are introducing the clothing line yago. For our pupoises it may stand for Your apparel guide online.
We developing this section of the page clothing and apparel to sell. With that being a launching point for the next great universal platform. Yago is as good as google, bing, or yahoo.